Carnyx

Europe Continent

The carnyx was a wind instrument of the Iron Age Celts, used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200. It was a type of bronze trumpet with an elongated S shape, held so that the long straight central portion was vertical and the short mouthpiece end section and the much wider bell were horizontal in opposed directions. The bell was styled in the shape of an open-mouthed boar’s, or other animal’s, head.

It was used in warfare, probably to incite troops to battle and intimidate opponents, as Polybius recounts. The instrument’s significant height allowed it to be heard over the heads of the participants in battles or ceremonies.

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Erhu 

Asia Continent

The erhu, is a two-stringed bowed musical instrument, more specifically a spike fiddle, which may also be called a Southern Fiddle, and sometimes known in the Western world as the Chinese violin or a Chinese two-stringed fiddle.

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Kora

Africa Continent

The kora is built from a large calabash, cut in half and covered with cow skin to make a resonator with a long hardwood neck. The skin is supported by two handles that run under it. It has 21 strings, each playing a different note. It supports a notched double free-standing bridge. It doesn’t fit into any one category of musical instrument, but rather several, and must be classified as a “double-bridge-harp-lute”. The strings run in two divided ranks, making it a double harp. They do not end in a soundboard but are held in notches on a bridge, making it a bridge harp. They originate from a string arm or neck and cross a bridge directly supported by a resonating chamber, making it a lute too.

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Didgeridoo

Australia Continent

The didgeridoo ( also spelt didjeridu, among other variants) is a wind instrument, played with continuously vibrating lips to produce a continuous drone while using a special breathing technique called circular breathing. The didgeridoo was developed by Aboriginal peoples of northern Australia at least 1,500 years ago, and is now in use around the world, though still most strongly associated with Indigenous Australian music. The Yolŋu name for the instrument is the yiḏaki, or more recently by some, mandapul; in the Bininj Kunwok language of West Arnhem Land it is known as mako.

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Huaco Silbador

America Continent

These unique instruments, or shamanic tools as we will later discuss, are called whistling vessels or otherwise known in Spanish as huaco silbadors. Most of the original vessels are estimated to have been made around 500 BC – 1200 AD, and a majority of them have been found in Peru.

This article will discuss the origin of these intriguing pieces, what they were used for, how they work and the future of whistling vessels.

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