Carnyx

Europe Continent

The carnyx was a wind instrument of the Iron Age Celts, used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200. It was a type of bronze trumpet with an elongated S shape, held so that the long straight central portion was vertical and the short mouthpiece end section and the much wider bell were horizontal in opposed directions. The bell was styled in the shape of an open-mouthed boar’s, or other animal’s, head.

It was used in warfare, probably to incite troops to battle and intimidate opponents, as Polybius recounts. The instrument’s significant height allowed it to be heard over the heads of the participants in battles or ceremonies.

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Erhu 

Asia Continent

The erhu, is a two-stringed bowed musical instrument, more specifically a spike fiddle, which may also be called a Southern Fiddle, and sometimes known in the Western world as the Chinese violin or a Chinese two-stringed fiddle.

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Kora

Africa Continent

The kora is built from a large calabash, cut in half and covered with cow skin to make a resonator with a long hardwood neck. The skin is supported by two handles that run under it. It has 21 strings, each playing a different note. It supports a notched double free-standing bridge. It doesn’t fit into any one category of musical instrument, but rather several, and must be classified as a “double-bridge-harp-lute”. The strings run in two divided ranks, making it a double harp. They do not end in a soundboard but are held in notches on a bridge, making it a bridge harp. They originate from a string arm or neck and cross a bridge directly supported by a resonating chamber, making it a lute too.

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Didgeridoo

Australia Continent

The didgeridoo ( also spelt didjeridu, among other variants) is a wind instrument, played with continuously vibrating lips to produce a continuous drone while using a special breathing technique called circular breathing. The didgeridoo was developed by Aboriginal peoples of northern Australia at least 1,500 years ago, and is now in use around the world, though still most strongly associated with Indigenous Australian music. The Yolŋu name for the instrument is the yiḏaki, or more recently by some, mandapul; in the Bininj Kunwok language of West Arnhem Land it is known as mako.

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Huaco Silbador

America Continent

These unique instruments, or shamanic tools as we will later discuss, are called whistling vessels or otherwise known in Spanish as huaco silbadors. Most of the original vessels are estimated to have been made around 500 BC – 1200 AD, and a majority of them have been found in Peru.

This article will discuss the origin of these intriguing pieces, what they were used for, how they work and the future of whistling vessels.

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Pan Flute

America Continent

Pan Flute (also known as panpipes or syrinx) is a musical instrument based on the principle of the closed tube, consisting of multiple pipes of gradually increasing length (and occasionally girth). Multiple varieties of pan flutes have been popular as folk instruments. The pipes are typically made from bamboo, giant cane, or local reeds. Other materials include wood, plastic, metal and ivory.

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Odaiko

Asia Continent

The Odaiko is a large Japanese barrel-shaped drum. Taut skins are stretched across each end of the body, though usually only one end is struck. It sometimes rests on a stand and is played with two sticks whose ends may be padded. The odaiko is used as a bass drum in many styles of Japanese music, especially in the theater and for some types of festive dances.

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Theorbo 

Europe Continent

The theorbo is a plucked string instrument of the lute family, with an extended neck and a second pegbox. Like a lute, a theorbo has a curved-back sound box (a hollow box) with a wooden top, typically with a sound hole, and a neck extending out from the soundbox. As with the lute, the player plucks or strums the strings with one hand while “fretting” (pressing down) the strings with the other hand; pressing the strings in different places on the neck produces different pitches (notes), thus enabling the performer to play chords, basslines and melodies.

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Taus

Asia Continent

The Taus is a bowed string instrument from the north Indian region of Punjab. The taus was invented by Guru Hargobind, the sixth Guru of the Sikhs. The Taus was later modified into the lighter Dilruba by Guru Gobind Singh. It has a peacock body and neck with 20 heavy metal frets. The neck consists of a long wooden rack with 28-30 strings and is played with a bow.

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Serpent 

Europe Continent

The serpent is a bass wind instrument, descended from the cornett, and a distant ancestor of the tuba, with a mouthpiece like a brass instrument but side holes like a woodwind. It is usually a long cone bent into a snakelike shape, hence the name. The serpent is closely related to the cornett, although it is not part of the cornett family, due to the absence of a thumb hole. It is generally made out of wood, with walnut being a particularly popular choice. The outside is covered with dark brown or black leather. Despite wooden construction and the fact that it has finger holes rather than valves, it is usually classed as a brass; the Hornbostel–Sachs scheme of musical instrument classification places it alongside trumpets.

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Mokugyo

Asia Continent

wooden fish — also known as a Chinese temple block or wooden bell— is a wooden percussion instrument that originated from East Asia. It is used by monks and lay people in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition. It is often used during rituals usually involving the recitation of sutras, mantras, or other Buddhist texts. The wooden fish is mainly used by Buddhist disciples in China, Japan, Korea, and other East Asian countries use it in religious ceremonies. It may also be referred to as a Chinese block, Korean block or, rarely, as a skull. In most Zen/Ch’an Buddhist traditions, the wooden fish serves to keep the rhythm during sutra chanting. In Pure Land Buddhism, it is used when chanting the name of Amitabha.

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Pipa

Asia Continent

The pipa, pípá, or p’i-p’a (Chinese: 琵琶) is a four-stringed Chinese musical instrument, belonging to the plucked category of instruments. The pipa is one of the most popular Chinese instruments and has been played for almost two thousand years in China. Sometimes called the Chinese lute, the instrument has a pear-shaped wooden body with a varying number of frets ranging from 12 to 31. Another Chinese four-string plucked lute is the liuqin, which looks like a smaller version of the pipa. The pear-shaped instrument may have existed in China as early as the Han dynasty, and although historically the term pipa was once used to refer to a variety of plucked chordophones, its usage since the Song dynasty refers exclusively to the pear-shaped instrument

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Gong

Asia Continent

gong is an East and Southeast Asian musical percussion instrument that takes the form of a flat, circular metal disc which is hit with a mallet.

The origin of gongs is probably China’s Western Regions in the sixth century. The term gong originated in the Indonesian island of Java. Scientific and archaeological research has established that Burma, China, Indonesia (Java) and Annam were the four main gong manufacturing centres of the ancient world. The gong found its way into the Western World in the 18th century when it was also used in the percussion section of a Western-style symphony orchestra. A form of bronze cauldron gong known as a resting bell was widely used in ancient Greece and Rome, for instance in the famous Oracle of Dodona, where disc gongs were also used.

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Guzheng

Asia Continent

The zheng or guzheng (Chinese: 古箏; pinyin: gǔzhēng; lit.: ‘ancient zheng‘), is a Chinese plucked zither with a more than 2,500-year history. The modern guzheng commonly has 21, 25 or 26 strings, is 64 inches (1.6 m) long, and is tuned in a major pentatonic scale.

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Taiko

Asia Continent

Taiko are a broad range of Japanese percussion instruments. In Japanese, the term refers to any kind of drum, but outside Japan, it is used specifically to refer to any of the various Japanese drums called wadaiko“Japanese drums”) and to the form of ensemble taiko drumming more specifically called kumi-daiko (“set of drums”). The process of constructing taiko varies between manufacturers, and the preparation of both the drum body and skin can take several years depending on the method.

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Celloridoo

Asia Continent

If you’ve ever felt like you wanted to take up a musical instrument but couldn’t make up your mind what to play, Aidin Ardjomandi’s new invention might be of interest. The Iranian designer has just won the A’ Design bronze award in the musical instrument category for his brand new instrument Celloridoo.

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